MAGIC102: Slow viscous flow

Course details

Semester

Autumn 2021
Monday, October 4th to Friday, December 10th

Hours

Live lecture hours
10
Recorded lecture hours
0
Total advised study hours
40

Timetable

Mondays
13:05 - 13:55

Course forum

Visit the MAGIC102 forum

Description

The Reynolds number gives the ratio of inertial to viscous effects in a fluid flow.

When the Reynolds number is small, inertial effects are negligible and the Du/Dt term in the Navier-Stokes equations may be neglected.

This simplifies the Navier-Stokes equations, making them linear and instantaneous.

These simplifications make solving low-Reynolds-number flow problems much easier than high Reynolds number flows.

This module will consider the circumstances under which the Reynolds number will be small and examine the basic properties of low-Reynolds-number flows.

We shall present a number of solution techniques, and show how they can be applied to a range of problems.

In the course of this, students will meet various useful applied mathematics methods, including solution by potentials, boundary integral methods, and asymptotic approximations. 

Prerequisites

Essential
  • Vector Calculus (div, grad, curl, line,surface/volume integrals, divergence theorem)
  • Differential Equations (methods for first-order ordinary differential equations)
  • Basic Fluid Mechanics (introductory course in inviscid fluid mechanics)
Desirable / Complimentary
  • Further Fluid mechanics (introductory course in viscous fluid mechanics)
  • Tensors and the Einstein Summation Convention (some previous experience useful)
  • Non-dimensionalisation / scaling analysis

Syllabus

  • Introduction to low-Reynolds-number flow (3 lectures)
    The Stokes equations and boundary conditions. Basic properties, uniqueness theorem, reciprocal theorem, minimum dissipation theorem. Oscillating Couette flow and Poiseuille flow.
  • Fundamental solutions and representation by potentials (4 lectures)
    Solution using potentials. Papkovich-Neuber potentials, flow past a rigid sphere. Boundary integrals and the multi-pole expansion.
  • Slender-body theory (3 lectures)
    Basic derivation. Applications to sedimenting slender objects and swimming micro-organisms.

Lecturer

  • RW

    Dr Robert Whittaker

    University
    University of East Anglia

Bibliography

No bibliography has been specified for this course.

Assessment

Attention needed

Assessment information will be available nearer the time.

Files

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Lectures

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